Flora of Sumatra: Vascular plant collection of selected families deposited at Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA)

Latest version published by Herbarium of Andalas University on May 23, 2022 Herbarium of Andalas University

Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) is one of the active herbaria on Sumatra, Indonesia. Currently, the herbarium hosts about 65,000 sheets of herbarium collections, consisting of vascular plants and moss. The main collections are from Sumatra and adjacent islands. The herbarium serves both for research and education. Since 2018, we worked with the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) to catalog and digitize our collections to improve the accessibility of the specimens. Since then, we have cataloged up to 13,568 of geo-referenced data from 374 species in 85 genera within 15 families of vascular plants. Among all of the families we have cataloged are Balsaminaceae, Begoniaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fagaceae, Gesneriaceae, Nepenthaceae, Polygalaceae, Rosaceae, Sapotaceae, Symplocaceae, Pandaceae, Phyllanthaceae, Putranjivaceae and Chrysobalanaceae. Among them are 40 species that are endemic to Sumatra. The program is our first step to improve research and education for species on Sumatra.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 13,568 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 13,568 records in English (380 KB) - Update frequency: continually
Metadata as an EML file download in English (49 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (27 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Nurainas N, Taufiq A, Handika H, Syamsuardi S (2022): Flora of Sumatra: Vascular plant collection of selected families deposited at Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA). v1.27. Herbarium of Andalas University. Dataset/Occurrence. https://doi.org/10.15468/sncpxn

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Herbarium of Andalas University. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC-BY-NC) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 3e0987c4-375f-4d68-b2ac-5e4e3a6d3d6d.  Herbarium of Andalas University publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Indonesian Biodiversity Information Facility.

Keywords

ANDA; Andalas University; darwin core; endemic; geo-reference; Indonesia; Sumatra; Specimen; Occurrence

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Nurainas Nurainas
Head of Herbarium
Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) Limau Manis 25163 Padang West Sumatra ID +6281310818597
Ahmad Taufiq
Data Manager
Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) Limau Manis 25163 Padang West Sumatra ID +6281363457262
Heru Handika
Researcher
Museum of Natural Science and Department Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University Baton Rouge US +12259165691
Syamsuardi Syamsuardi
Curator
Laboratory of Plant taxonomy, Department of Biology, Mathematics and Natural Science, Andalas University 25163 Padang West Sumatra ID +6281374777749

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Nurainas Nurainas
Head of Herbarium
Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) Limau Manis 25163 Padang West Sumatra ID +6281310818597

Who filled in the metadata:

Ahmad Taufiq
Data Manager
Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) Limau Manis 25163 Padang West Sumatra ID +6281363457262

Geographic Coverage

The specimens hosted at the Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA) are primarily from Sumatra. With 473,481 km² in size, the island is the sixth biggest island in the world. It is tropical island located at the coordinate 0° 0′ 0″ N, 102° 0′ 0″ E. The specimens hosted at the herbarium were from several provinces, such as West Sumatra, Jambi, Riau, North Sumatra, Aceh, Bengkulu and Lampung. In addition, the herbarium also hosts several specimens from West Java, Selangor Malaysia, and Kagoshima Prefecture Japan. All of these specimens were donated by foreign plant researchers visiting the herbarium. The specimens were also collected from conservation areas on Sumatra, such as the Kerinci Seblat National Park, Siberut National Park, Lembah Harau Nature Reserve, Rimbo Panti Nature Reserve, Lurah Berangin Nature Reserve, Bung Hatta Forest Park Conservation Area, and Syarif Hasyim Forest Park Conservation Area. All of the collections were collected from wide range of altitudinal elevations and habitats, from lowland tropical forest up to highland forest as well as montane forest on the Bukit Barisan Mountains. In general, the collections were from volcanoes on Sumatra, such as Mt. Sibayak, Mt. Sinabung, Mt. Sorik Merapi, Mt. Pangulubao, Mt. Sibuatan, Mt. Talamau, Mt. Sago, Mt. Marapi, Mt. Singgalang, Mt. Tandikek, Mt. Gadut, Mt. Talang, Mt. Tujuh, Mt. Kerinci, Mt. Pesagi.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-6.009, 94.966], North East [5.66, 106.436]

Taxonomic Coverage

We have digitized 13,568 sheets of specimens in the group of Magnoliopsida. All of the specimens are in the class Equisetopsida, consisting of 15 families: Fagaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Balsaminaceae, Begoniaceae, Symplocaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Sapotaceae, Rosaceae, Nepenthaceae, Polygalaceae, Gesneriaceae, Pandaceae, Phyllanthaceae, Putranjivaceae, and Chrysobalanaceae. In total, we have digitized 374 species in 85 genera from all the families. The most digitized genera are in the family Euphorbiaceae. Among all of the species that have been digitized, 76 species are listed in IUCN Redlist database, consisting of Least Concern (38 species), Vulnerable (9 species), Near Threatened (4 species), Critically Endangered (12 species), and Endangered (13 species) (IUCN, 2018). Furthermore, 20 species are listed as protected species under the government regulation of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry (P.92/MENLHK/SETJEN/KUM.1/8/2018). Among all the species that have been digitized, 40 species are endemic to Sumatra.

Family  Balsaminaceae (Jewelweed),  Begoniaceae (Begonia),  Chrysobalanaceae (Maranthes),  Dipterocarpaceae (Keruing),  Euphorbiaceae (Cooper leaf),  Fagaceae (Oak),  Gesneriaceae (Mapele),  Nepenthaceae (Pitcher plant),  Pandaceae (Kayu busih),  Phyllanthaceae (Andarupis),  Polygalaceae (Sasapuan),  Putranjivaceae (Bintang mabas),  Rosaceae (Rose),  Sapotaceae (Manatu),  Symplocaceae (Asiatic sweetleaf)
Genus  Acalypha (Cooper leaf),  Agrostistachys (Gelimtum),  Alchornea (Khang poi),  Aleurites (Bunsangil),  Anisoptera (Keruing),  Baccaurea (Belembik),  Baliospermum (Neruvam),  Begonia (Begonia),  Bischofia (Java cedar),  Breynia (Fart bush),  Bridelia (Kanidei),  Castanopsis (Malayan chestnut),  Cephalomappa (Bantas),  Chrysophyllum (Caimito),  Claoxylon (Gispang),  Cleistanthus (Komuning),  Cnesmone (Loti sorot),  Codiaeum (Puring),  Croton (Balek puteh),  Cyrtandra (Mapele),  Cyrtandromoea,  Didissandra (Tarom hutan),  Didymocarpus (Dwarf chirita),  Dipterocarpus (Keruing),  Drypetes (Bintang babas),  Duchesnea (Indian strawberry),  Endospermum (Antah bulan),  Epithema (Fleshy epthema),  Eriobotrya (Berry),  Euphorbia (Fire plant),  Flueggea (Patala),  Ganua (Ganua),  Glochidion (Sakah-sakah),  Hancea (Enserai),  Henckelia (Bracted stone flower),  Hevea (Rubber),  Homalanthus (Bangki),  Homonoia (Willow leaved water croton),  Hopea (Merawan),  Hura (Sandbox tree),  Hydrocera (Marsh Henna),  Impatiens (Jewelweed),  Jatropa (Physic nut),  Lithocarpus (Tanoak),  Loxocarpus (Gesneria),  Loxonia,  Macaranga (Mahang),  Madhuca (Manatu),  Mallotus (Balik angin),  Manihot (Cassava),  Manilkara (Chikoo),  Megistostigma (Megistostigma),  Mimusops (Tanjung),  Monophyllaea (Tongkat ali),  Nepenthes (Pitcher),  Palaquium (Nato nasi),  Paraboea,  Parashorea (White meranti),  Payena (Bee taul),  Phyllanthus (Meniran),  Planchonella (Nyatoh nangka merah),  Pleionuma,  Polygala (Sasapuan),  Prunus (Janteli),  Quercus (Oak),  Rhaphiolepis (Snow maiden),  Rhynchoglossum (Malayalam),  Rhynchotechum (Assamese),  Ricinus (Castor),  Rosa,  Rubus (Berete),  Sauropus (Katoei),  Shorea (Meranti),  Sorbus (Berry),  Streptocarpus (Beef tongue),  Suregada (Suregada),  Symplocos,  Trigonobalanus (Trig oak),  Trigonostemon (Jingah tulang tiga),  Vatica (Meranti),  Xanthophyllum (Nyalin),  Antidesma (Buah jerawai),  Aporosa (Kumpang),  Galearia,  Maranthes (Maranthes)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 1905-06-16 / 2018-12-25

Project Data

The project started in April 2018 and will end in March 2019. The aims of the project are to digitize the collections hosted at Herbarium ANDA; to prepare and establish well-managed and integrated specimen database following GBIF standard; to manage collections, locality information and specimen images; and to produce the checklist of the Flora of Sumatra. The participants and the main stakeholders involved in the projects consisted of students and lecturers at the Department of Biology at Andalas University, some world’s well-known herbariums including their staffs, and our domestic partner, the Indonesian Biodiversity Information Facility, as well as respected plant taxonomists working on the targeted taxa. Students and lecturers at the Department of Biology Andalas University are our main partner to provide supports for the project from within the university. Our herbarium partners participate for data verification and specimen identification. InaBIF provides us with their expertise and support for data publication.

Title The Flora of Sumatra: Digitizing and databasing specimens of the Sumatran Flora deposited in Herbarium of Andalas University (ANDA)
Identifier BIFA3_17
Funding GBIF Grant Letter 2018 (Collections data mobilization grant), BIFA3_017
Study Area Description The main collections are from Sumatra and adjacent islands.
Design Description The information on the specimen labels is our main data source. For data collection, we conducted in three steps: data capture, data cleaning, and data publication. In the data capture process, we collected all the information on the specimen’s label, and we input the information into Microsoft Excel spreadsheets using Darwin-Core format. In this process, we grouped the specimen information into three groups, consisting of data occurrence, taxon information, and event. We save the file in csv (comma-separated values) format. We included specimen photos and scanning data into the database incorporated in associateMedia field. All the images were stored in flickr-pro media, which then will link with the filed in the dataset. We conducted data cleaning to ensure consistency and standardized data input for the dataset. We used OpenRefine for batch error handling, Canadensys tools for coordinate conversion, and Splink for coordinate verification. To verify the taxonomic nomenclature, we used resolver, iPlant collaborative, ECAT, and Plant list. All the tools we used are open-source software or available as an open online platform. Data publication includes data publishing on GBIF and scientific papers. We published all the dataset that has been cleaned and verified according to our standard on GBIF website using Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) available through the link http://ipt.biologi.lipi.go.id/. After verified by GBIF, all the data will be published under the publisher Herbarium of Andalas University, available through the link https://www.gbif.org/publisher/43f4255c-f218-4a17-857a-ba3ac8456191. The data paper is written following the metadata template available in the IPT. For scientific papers, we will publish the data following the targeted journal format.

The personnel involved in the project:

Principal Investigator
Nurainas Nurainas
Content Provider
Ahmad Taufiq
Reviewer
Syamsuardi Syamsuardi
Reviewer
Heru Handika
Metadata Provider
Try Surya Harapan
Metadata Provider
Suryani Kasih Christine Bawamenewi
Metadata Provider
Firham Yasra
Metadata Provider
Adek Adi Putra
Metadata Provider
Nindy Ika Wahyuni
Metadata Provider
Rayfiqa Maulidah
Metadata Provider
Rezi Rahmi Amolia
Metadata Provider
Fajri Laili
Metadata Provider
Panji Fauzi
Metadata Provider
Suci Ramadani
Metadata Provider
Thoriq Alfath Febriamansyah
Metadata Provider
Muhammad Ikhsan
Metadata Provider
Eryscha Dwi Syukma

Sampling Methods

The collecting method for the dried specimens was referred to published procedures of preparing herbarium materials (Bridson and Forman,1992). The plant materials were collected and pressed in the field then mounted on an A2 paper after the specimens were dried. Before installation into the herbarium cabinets, the specimens were put into plastic bags. Every sheet of specimens was labeled with the standard information for herbarium collections, including taxonomic identification, locality information, geo-references, collector information, and ecological data. For insect control, we freeze the specimens periodically in -20 degrees Celsius freezer for 72 hours. All of the specimens were stored in the herbarium cabinets. The storage rooms were equipped with temperature and humidity control. All of the specimens were in alphabetical orders based on the families, grouped in several groups of plants, such as dicots, monocots, ferns, and mosses.

Study Extent The collections hosted at the Herbarium ANDA were from research projects of faculties, foreign researchers, and students at the university. The collecting methods were using the standard collecting method for dried specimens. A few donated specimens were collected based on the collecting method used at the institutions from the specimen originated. The duplicates of the specimens were hosted across several herbarium, such as Bogoriense (BO), Singapore Botanical Garden (SING), and Botanical Garden of Edinburgh (E). The duplicate specimens that have not been sent were hosted at a designated room for duplicate specimens at the Herbarium ANDA. Every year, we add around 200 sheets of new specimens into the herbarium.
Quality Control We divided our working groups into two groups: a) taxonomic determination or identification group and b) data geo-referencing group. For taxonomic determination, the identification was verified by experts on the designated taxa, and also was using book references for the taxa (Ashton, 1982; Van Der Meijden, 1984; Kalkman, 1993; Shaw, 1981). The experts are writers and researchers for the area of studies and have published using the materials at the Herbarium ANDA (Utami, 2006; Hughes, 2009, 2015, Hernawati, 2006). The datum references for each coordinate were collected from the specimen labels using the WGS84 standard. If the coordinate of the locations was not recorded on the labels, we used Google Map to obtain the coordinate based on the locality information of the villages recorded on the labels.

Method step description:

  1. The information on the specimen labels is our main data source. For data collection, we conducted in three steps: data capture, data cleaning, and data publication. In the data capture process, we collected all the information on the specimen’s label, and we input the information into Microsoft Excel spreadsheets using Darwin-Core format. In this process, we grouped the specimen information into three groups, consisting of data occurrence, taxon information, and event. We save the file in csv (comma-separated values) format. We included specimen photos and scanning data into the database incorporated in associateMedia field. All the images were stored in flickr-pro media, which then will link with the filed in the dataset. We conducted data cleaning to ensure consistency and standardized data input for the dataset. We used OpenRefine for batch error handling, Canadensys tools for coordinate conversion, and Splink for coordinate verification. To verify the taxonomic nomenclature, we used resolver, iPlant collaborative, ECAT, and Plant list. All the tools we used are open-source software or available as an open online platform. Data publication includes data publishing on GBIF and scientific papers. We published all the dataset that has been cleaned and verified according to our standard on GBIF website using Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) available through the link http://ipt.biologi.lipi.go.id/. After verified by GBIF, all the data will be published under the publisher Herbarium of Andalas University, available through the link https://www.gbif.org/publisher/43f4255c-f218-4a17-857a-ba3ac8456191. The data paper is written following the metadata template available in the IPT. For scientific papers, we will publish the data following the targeted journal format.

Collection Data

Collection Name Spesimen Herbarium Universitas Andalas (ANDA)
Specimen preservation methods Mounted
Curatorial Units Count 13,600 +/- 13,568 sheets

Bibliographic Citations

  1. AKHRIADI, P., PRIMALDHI, A. and HAMBALI, M., 2008. Nepenthes naga, a new species of Nepenthaceae from Bukit Barisan of Sumatra. Reinwardtia, 12(5), pp.339-342.
  2. Ashton, P. S. 1982. Flora Malesiana. Series I-Spermatophyta. Flowering Plants Vol. 9, part 2, Dipterocarpaceae. Martinus Nijhoff. The Hague, Boston, London.
  3. Bridson, D., Forman, L. 1992. The Herbarium Handbook. Whitstable Litho Printers Ltd. Great Britain.
  4. Hernawati and Pitra A. 2006. A Field Guide to the Nepenthes of Sumatra. Nepenthes Team and PILI-NGO Movement. Bogor. Indonesia.
  5. Hughes, M., GIRMANSYAH, D. and Ardi, W.H., 2009. Seven new species of Begonia from Sumatra. Gard. Bull. Singapore, 61, pp.29-44.
  6. Hughes, M., Girmansyah, D. and Ardi, W.H., 2015. Further discoveries in the ever-expanding genus Begonia (Begoniaceae): fifteen new species from Sumatra. European journal of Taxonomy, (167).
  7. IUCN. 2018. https://www.iucnredlist.org/. Accessed in Februari 2019. Kalkman, C. (1993). Rosaceae. Flora Malesiana-Series 1, Spermatophyta, 11(2), 227-351.
  8. Kemetrian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan Republik Indonesia. Peraturan Mentri Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan Republik Indonesia Nomor P.92/MENLHK/SETJEN/KUM.1/8/2018. Tentang Jenis Tumbuhan Satwa yang dilindungi.
  9. Lee, C.I.C. and Akhriadi, P., 2006. Two new species of Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae) from North Sumatra. Blumea-Biodiversity, Evolution and Biogeography of Plants, 51(3), pp.561-568.
  10. Plant List. 2019. http://www.theplantlist.org/. Accessed Februari 2019. Shaw, H. A. (1981). the Euphorbiaceae of Sumatra. Kew Bulletin, 239-374.
  11. Utami, N. 2006. Impatiens spp. (Balsaminaceae) ednemik di Sumatera dan potensi sebaaga tanaman hias. Biodiversitas. Vol. 7 (2) 2006: 135-138
  12. Van Der Meijden, R. (1984). Polygalaceae. Flora Malesiana-Series 1, Spermatophyta, 10(1), 455-539.

Additional Metadata

Purpose The aim of this project is to digitize the specimens hosted at the Herbarium ANDA, to publish a checklist of the flora of Sumatra, and to promote the database of Sumatran plant diversity.
Alternative Identifiers 3e0987c4-375f-4d68-b2ac-5e4e3a6d3d6d
http://ipt.biologi.lipi.go.id/resource?r=anda_test2